Well forget June and July – the almost constant rain at Dogstar meant very few nights of observing. Everyone should do an ‘anti rain dance’ for the weekend of August 12/13 for the Perseid meteor shower. Check out this link for more details.

There will be another “super moon” on July 22nd. This one is less “super” than the June full moon but nevertheless occurs when the moon is one day past its orbital perigee – the point when the moon’s orbit brings it closest to the earth. Depending on which definition of “super” you believe there are as many as four or as few as one super moon each year. Not really a big deal astronomically speaking but worth a look if the skies are clear. In general unless you are a lunar astronomer nights of near or full moons are when astronomers stay inside and catch up on their paper work.

Venus is still visible in the twilight a dusk in the west. Saturn is still visible in the south most of the night (and near the waxing moon on the nights of the 16th and 17th).